Title

Improving perinatal depression care: the Massachusetts Child Psychiatry Access Project for Moms

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Psychiatry; Systems and Psychosocial Advances Research Center; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Department of Quantitative Health Sciences

Date

5-2016

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Maternal and Child Health | Mental and Social Health | Psychiatric and Mental Health | Psychiatry | Psychiatry and Psychology | Women's Health

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Perinatal depression is common and associated with poor birth, infant and child outcomes. Screening for perinatal depression alone does not improve treatment rates or patient outcomes. This paper describes the development, implementation and outcomes of a new and low-cost population-based program to help providers address perinatal depression, the Massachusetts Child Psychiatry Access Project (MCPAP) for Moms.

METHOD: MCPAP for Moms builds providers' capacity to address perinatal depression through (1) trainings and toolkits on depression screening, assessment and treatment; (2) telephonic access to perinatal psychiatric consultation for providers serving pregnant and postpartum women; and (3) care coordination to link women with individual psychotherapy and support groups.

RESULTS: In the first 18 months, MCPAP for Moms enrolled 87 Ob/Gyn practices, conducted 100 trainings and served 1123 women. Of telephone consultations provided, 64% were with obstetric providers/midwives and 16% were with psychiatrists. MCPAP for Moms costs $8.38 per perinatal woman per year ($0.70 per month) or $600,000 for 71,618 deliveries annually in Massachusetts.

CONCLUSION: The volume of encounters, number of women served and low cost suggest that MCPAP for Moms is a feasible, acceptable and sustainable approach that can help frontline providers effectively identify and manage perinatal depression.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2016 May-Jun;40:12-7. doi: 10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2016.03.002. Epub 2016 Mar 21. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

27079616