Title

Behavioral Health Care Needs, Detention-Based Care, and Criminal Recidivism at Community Reentry From Juvenile Detention: A Multisite Survival Curve Analysis

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Psychiatry, Systems and Psychosocial Advances Research Center

Date

7-1-2015

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Adolescent; Child; Crime; Health Services Needs and Demand; Humans; Indiana; Juvenile Delinquency; Male; Mental Disorders; Mental Health Services; Prisons

Disciplines

Health Services Research | Mental and Social Health | Mental Disorders | Psychiatric and Mental Health | Psychiatry

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We examined the provision of behavioral health services to youths detained in Indiana between 2008 and 2012 and the impact of services on recidivism.

METHOD: We obtained information about behavioral health needs, behavioral health treatment received, and recidivism within 12 months after release for 8363 adolescents (aged 12-18 years; 79.4% male). We conducted survival analyses to determine whether behavioral health services significantly affected time to recidivating.

RESULTS: Approximately 19.1% of youths had positive mental health screens, and 25.3% of all youths recidivated within 12 months after release. Of youths with positive screens, 29.2% saw a mental health clinician, 16.1% received behavioral health services during detention, and 30.0% received referrals for postdetention services. Survival analyses showed that being male, Black, and younger, and having higher scores on the substance use or irritability subscales of the screen predicted shorter time to recidivism. Receiving a behavior precaution, behavioral health services in detention, or an assessment in the community also predicted shorter time to recidivating.

CONCLUSIONS: Findings support previous research showing that behavioral health problems are related to recidivism and that Black males are disproportionately rearrested after detention.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Am J Public Health. 2015 Jul;105(7):1372-8. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2014.302529. Epub 2015 May 14. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

25973804