Title

Factors related to weight loss behavior in a multiracial/ethnic workforce

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine

Date

6-20-2009

Document Type

Article

Subjects

Adolescent; Adult; African Americans; Cross-Sectional Studies; European Continental Ancestry Group; Female; Health Behavior; Health Surveys; Hispanic Americans; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Obesity; Personnel, Hospital; Self Concept; Socioeconomic Factors; Weight Loss; Young Adult

Disciplines

Behavioral Disciplines and Activities | Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms | Community Health and Preventive Medicine | Preventive Medicine

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We examined whether factors associated with attempting to lose weight in a hospital-based employee workforce varied by race/ethnicity.

METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 6 hospitals in a health system in central Massachusetts. The stratified random sample included 813 employees; men and and non-White employees were oversampled. The primary outcome measure was current evidence-based weight loss attempts.

RESULTS: Factors positively associated with attempting to lose weight among non-Hispanic Blacks included self-perceived overweight, female sex, higher education, physician recommendation to lose weight, and having a chronic medical condition. Among Hispanics, body mass index and self-perceived overweight were associated with attempts to lose weight, while working full time and second or third shift were associated with lower likelihood of weight loss attempts. Among non-Hispanic Whites, self-perceived overweight, female sex, higher education, and physician recommendation to lose weight were positively associated with attempting to lose weight, while working full time and working third shift were negatively associated.

CONCLUSIONS: Rates of overweight and obesity were high among hospital employees. Findings suggest that factors associated with attempting to lose weight vary across racial and ethnic groups. Workplace-based interventions for weight control should include strategies tailored to these differences.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Ethn Dis. 2009 Spring;19(2):154-60. Link to article on publisher's website

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

19537226