Title

A school nurse-delivered adolescent smoking cessation intervention: a randomized controlled trial

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine

Date

10-11-2006

Document Type

Article

Subjects

Adolescent; Female; Health Promotion; Health Surveys; Humans; *Interpersonal Relations; Male; Massachusetts; Program Development; Program Evaluation; Questionnaires; School Nursing; Smoking; *Smoking Cessation

Disciplines

Behavioral Disciplines and Activities | Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms | Community Health and Preventive Medicine | Preventative Medicine

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a school nurse-delivered smoking cessation intervention to improve abstinence rates among adolescents interested in quitting.

METHODS: Seventy-one high schools in Massachusetts were randomized to either a four-session one-on-one school nurse-delivered smoking cessation intervention (37 schools, n = 571) or usual smoking cessation care control condition (34 schools, n = 577). Adolescents in grades 9-12 who smoked in the past 30 days completed surveys at baseline, 6 weeks and 3 months. The study was conducted during the 2002-2003 school year.

RESULTS: Thirty-day self-reported abstinence rates were significantly greater in students in the intervention compared to control condition at 6 weeks (18% vs. 2%, respectively) and 3 months (24% vs. 5%, respectively). After adjusting for school and potential confounders, students in the intervention schools had odds of quitting 8 times greater than students in the control schools at 6 weeks (OR = 8.4; 95% CI 3.7, 20.6) and 6 times greater at 3 months (OR = 6.4; 95% CI 3.4, 11.4). School nurses delivered intervention with a high degree of fidelity.

CONCLUSIONS: A four-session smoking cessation intervention can feasibly be delivered by school nurses and increase self-reported short-term abstinence rates among students interested in quitting smoking.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Prev Med. 2006 Oct;43(4):312-20. Epub 2006 Jul 10. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

16828858