UMMS Affiliation

Program in Gene Function and Expression; Program in Molecular Medicine; Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology; Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine

Date

6-14-2012

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Jumonji Domain-Containing Histone Demethylases; Gluconeogenesis

Disciplines

Genetics and Genomics

Abstract

Hepatic gluconeogenesis is required for maintaining blood glucose homeostasis; yet, in diabetes mellitus, this process is unrestrained and is a major contributor to fasting hyperglycemia. To date, the impacts of chromatin modifying enzymes and chromatin landscape on gluconeogenesis are poorly understood. Through catalyzing the removal of methyl groups from specific lysine residues in the histone tail, histone demethylases modulate chromatin structure and, hence, gene expression. Here we perform an RNA interference screen against the known histone demethylases and identify a histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36) demethylase, Jhdm1a, as a key negative regulator of gluconeogenic gene expression. In vivo, silencing of Jhdm1a promotes liver glucose synthesis, while its exogenous expression reduces blood glucose level. Importantly, the regulation of gluconeogenesis by Jhdm1a requires its demethylation activity. Mechanistically, we find that Jhdm1a regulates the expression of a major gluconeogenic regulator, C/EBPalpha. This is achieved, at least in part, by its USF1-dependent association with the C/EBPalpha promoter and its subsequent demethylation of dimethylated H3K36 on the C/EBPalpha locus. Our work provides compelling evidence that links histone demethylation to transcriptional regulation of gluconeogenesis and has important implications for the treatment of diabetes.

Comments

Citation: Pan D, Mao C, Zou T, Yao AY, Cooper MP, et al. (2012) The Histone Demethylase Jhdm1a Regulates Hepatic Gluconeogenesis. PLoS Genet 8(6): e1002761. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1002761 Link to article on publisher's site

Copyright: © 2012 Pan et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

22719268

Share

COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.