Title

Vitamin D Status and Adiposity in Pediatric Malabsorption Syndromes

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Endocrinology; Department of Quantitative Health Sciences

Date

5-30-2015

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Vitamin D; Vitamin D Deficiency; Adiposity; Malabsorption Syndromes

Disciplines

Digestive System Diseases | Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism | Pediatrics

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The combined effects of nutrient malabsorption and adiposity on vitamin D status are unclear in pediatric malabsorption syndromes.

AIM: To determine the relationship between adiposity and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) in malabsorption disorders.

METHODS: Prepubertal children of ages 3-12 with either lactose intolerance (LI) (n = 38, age 8.61 ± 3.08, male/female 19/19), or celiac disease (CD) (n = 24) were compared to healthy controls (n = 49, age 7.95 ± 2.64, male/female 28/21). A separate cohort of combined prepubertal and pubertal subjects with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (n = 59, age 16.4 ± 2.2, male/female 31/27) were also compared to healthy controls (n = 116, male/female 49/67, age 14.6 ± 4.4). Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25(OH)D of/l, overweight as body mass index (BMI) of ≥85th but <95th >percentile, and obesity as BMI ≥95th percentile.

RESULTS: Among the controls, 25(OH)D was significantly higher in the normal-weight prepubertal controls vs. the overweight/obese controls (p = 0.001), and similarly so for the combined cohort of prepubertal and pubertal controls (p = 0.031). In contrast, there was no significant difference in 25(OH)D concentration between the normal-weight vs. overweight/obese patients with LI (p = 0.335), CD (p = 0.387), and IBD (p = 0.883).

CONCLUSION: There is no association between adiposity and serum 25(OH)D in pediatric malabsorption syndromes. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

Comments

Citation: Nwosu BU, Maranda L. Vitamin D Status and Adiposity in Pediatric Malabsorption Syndromes. Digestion. 2015 May 30;92(1):1-7. DOI:10.1159/000381895. PubMed PMID: 26043850. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to article in PubMed

Keywords

Vitamin D, Adiposity, Inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease, Ulcerative colitis, Children and adolescents, Celiac disease, Lactose intolerance

PubMed ID

26043850