Title

The role of emotional health in functional outcomes after orthopaedic surgery: extending the biopsychosocial model to orthopaedics: AOA critical issues

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Orthopedics and Physical Rehabilitation

Date

11-6-2013

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Adaptation, Psychological; Emotions; Humans; Mental Health; Models, Psychological; Orthopedic Procedures; Orthopedics

Disciplines

Clinical Epidemiology | Epidemiology | Mental and Social Health | Orthopedics | Psychiatry and Psychology | Psychology

Abstract

Orthopaedic surgery successfully restores physical function and relieves pain in millions of Americans each year. In fact, orthopaedic surgery to treat arthritis of the knee and hip and lumbar spine conditions is among the top five surgical procedures by cost and volume in the United States. Despite the overwhelming success of orthopaedic procedures, functional improvement after surgery varies widely. Poor functional outcomes have been correlated with poor emotional health, such as anxiety, depression, poor coping skills, and poor social support1,2. The variation in functional outcomes exists despite state-of-the-art surgical techniques and is independent of postoperative complications. Furthermore, suboptimal functional outcomes associated with poor emotional health have been reported in a variety of orthopaedic specialties, including spine surgery, trauma care and/or fracture repair, rotator cuff repair, sports-related surgery (e.g., anterior cruciate ligament [ACL] reconstruction), total hip replacement, total knee replacement, and hand and upper extremities surgery. It is well established that the emotional health of the patient influences the outcome of many common orthopaedic surgeries.

Comments

Citation: Ayers DC, Franklin PD, Ring DC. The role of emotional health in functional outcomes after orthopaedic surgery: extending the biopsychosocial model to orthopaedics: AOA critical issues. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2013 Nov 6;95(21):e165. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.L.00799.

Related Resources

Link to article in PubMed

PubMed ID

24196477