UMMS Affiliation

MassBiologics; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Department of Pediatrics, Division of Immunology and Infectious Disease; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology

Date

6-2-2015

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Female Urogenital Diseases and Pregnancy Complications | Maternal and Child Health | Obstetrics and Gynecology | Women's Health

Abstract

Angiogenic biomarkers, including soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1), are thought to be predictors of preeclampsia onset; however, improvement is needed before a widespread diagnostic test can be utilized. Here we describe the development and use of diagnostic monoclonal antibodies specific to the two main splice variants of sFlt1, sFlt1-1 and sFlt1-14. These antibodies were selected for their sensitivity and specificity to their respective sFlt1 isoform in a capture ELISA format. Data from this pilot study suggest that sFlt1-1 may be more predictive of preeclampsia than total sFlt1. It may be possible to improve current diagnostic platforms if more specific antibodies are utilized.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Int J Mol Sci. 2015 Jun 2;16(6):12436-53. doi: 10.3390/ijms160612436. Link to article on publisher's site

Comments

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Keywords

diagnostic, isoforms, monoclonal antibody (mAb), preeclampsia, soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1), splice variants

PubMed ID

26042465

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

 
 

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