UMMS Affiliation

Department of Pathology; Department of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavorial Medicine; Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology

Date

8-4-2006

Document Type

Article

Subjects

Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing; Animals; Gout; Inflammation; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88; Receptors, Interleukin-1; Signal Transduction; Toll-Like Receptors; Uric Acid

Disciplines

Immunology and Infectious Disease | Life Sciences | Medicine and Health Sciences

Abstract

While it is known that monosodium urate (MSU) crystals cause the disease gout, the mechanism by which these crystals stimulate this inflammatory condition has not been clear. Here we find that the Toll/IL-1R (TIR) signal transduction adaptor myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) is required for acute gouty inflammation. In contrast, other TIR adaptor molecules, TIRAP/Mal, TRIF, and TRAM, are not required for this process. The MyD88-dependent TLR1, -2, -4, -6, -7, -9, and -11 and IL-18 receptor (IL-18R) are not essential for MSU-induced inflammation. Moreover, MSU does not stimulate HEK cells expressing TLR1-11 to activate NF-kappaB. In contrast, mice deficient in the MyD88-dependent IL-1R showed reduced inflammatory responses, similar to those observed in MyD88-deficient mice. Similarly, mice treated with IL-1 neutralizing antibodies also showed reduced MSU-induced inflammation, demonstrating that IL-1 production and IL-1R activation play essential roles in MSU-triggered inflammation. IL-1R deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells did not affect the inflammatory response; however, it was required in non-bone marrow-derived cells. These results indicate that IL-1 is essential for the MSU-induced inflammatory response and that the requirement of MyD88 in this process is primarily through its function as an adaptor molecule in the IL-1R signaling pathway.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: J Clin Invest. 2006 Aug;116(8):2262-71. Link to article on publisher's site

DOI of Published Version

10.1172/JCI28075

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal Title

The Journal of clinical investigation

PubMed ID

16886064

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