UMMS Affiliation

Department of Physiology

Date

1-29-1999

Document Type

Article

Subjects

3T3 Cells; ADP Ribose Transferases; Actins; Animals; *Botulinum Toxins; Cell Division; Cell Line; GTP-Binding Proteins; Hela Cells; Humans; Mice; Microinjections; Microtubules; Mitosis; Myosins; Rats; rho GTP-Binding Proteins

Disciplines

Cell Biology | Physiology

Abstract

We have investigated the role of the small GTP-binding protein Rho in cytokinesis by microinjecting an inhibitor, C3 ribosyltransferase, into cultured cells. Microinjection of C3 into prometaphase or metaphase normal rat kidney epithelial cells induced immediate and global cortical movement of actin toward the metaphase plate, without an apparent effect on the mitotic spindle. During anaphase, concentrated cortical actin filaments migrated with separating chromosomes, leaving no apparent concentration of actin filaments along the equator. Myosin II in injected epithelial cells showed a diffuse distribution throughout cell division. All treated, well-adherent cells underwent cleavage-like activities and most of them divided successfully. However, cytokinesis became abnormal, generating irregular ingressions and ectopic cleavage sites even when mitosis was blocked with nocodazole. The effects of C3 appeared to be dependent on cell adhesion; less adherent 3T3 fibroblasts exhibited irregular cortical ingression only when cells started to increase attachment during respreading, but managed to complete cytokinesis. Poorly adherent HeLa cells showed neither ectopic cleavage nor completion of cytokinesis. Our results indicate that Rho does not simply activate actin-myosin II interactions during cytokinesis, but regulates the spatial pattern of cortical activities and completion of cytokinesis possibly through modulating the mechanical strength of the cortex.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: J Cell Biol. 1999 Jan 25;144(2):305-13.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal Title

The Journal of cell biology

PubMed ID

9922456

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