Title

Systolic function in hypertensive men with concentric remodeling

UMMS Affiliation

Division of Cardiology of the University of Massachusetts Medical Center

Publication Date

10-23-1997

Document Type

Article

Subjects

Aged; Echocardiography; Humans; Hypertension; Male; Middle Aged; Myocardial Contraction; Myocardium; Obesity; Systole; Ventricular Function, Left

Disciplines

Life Sciences | Medicine and Health Sciences

Abstract

Hypertensive patients with concentric remodeling (relative wall thickness > or = 0.45 and normal left ventricular [LV] mass index) may have poor outcomes. It is unclear whether systolic function abnormalities, shown to be present in some patients with concentric LV hypertrophy (increased LV mass index and relative wall thickness > or = 0.45), are also present in patients with concentric remodeling. To assess LV pump, chamber, and myocardial function in hypertensive men with concentric remodeling, clinical and echocardiographic data of 118 hypertensive men with concentric remodeling were compared with data from 104 hypertensive men with normal relative wall thickness and normal LV mass index. Chamber function was assessed by relating endocardial fractional shortening to end-systolic circumferential stress, myocardial function was assessed by relating midwall fractional shortening to circumferential stress, and pump performance was assessed by stroke volume (Teichholz method). Compared with hypertensive men with normal relative wall thickness, concentric-remodeling patients had lower stroke volume (84 +/- 20 versus 111 +/- 20 mL, P < .001). Endocardial shortening was no different between the two groups (38 +/- 7% versus 40 +/- 7%, P=NS), but midwall shortening was lower in patients with concentric remodeling (20 +/- 3% versus 22 +/- 3%, P < .001), despite lower end-systolic stress (81 +/- 25 versus 117 +/- 37 g/cm2, P < .001). Endocardial and midwall stress-shortening regression plots classified 28% and 42%, respectively, of the concentric remodeling patients below the fifth percentile of hypertensive patients with normal geometry. These data indicate that indexes of chamber and myocardial function are lower than those observed in hypertensive patients with normal geometry. Thus, indices of chamber, myocardial, and pump performance indicate potential abnormalities in systolic function in men with concentric remodeling.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Hypertension. 1997 Oct;30(4):777-81.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Hypertension

PubMed ID

9336372