UMMS Affiliation

Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology

Date

7-8-2003

Document Type

Article

Subjects

Active Transport, Cell Nucleus; Animals; Cell Nucleus; Evolution, Molecular; Humans; Macromolecular Substances; Phylogeny; Poly(A)-Binding Proteins; Polyadenylation; Protein Biosynthesis; Protein Structure, Tertiary; *RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional; RNA Stability; RNA, Messenger

Disciplines

Microbiology | Molecular Genetics

Abstract

Most eukaryotic mRNAs are subject to considerable post-transcriptional modification, including capping, splicing, and polyadenylation. The process of polyadenylation adds a 3' poly(A) tail and provides the mRNA with a binding site for a major class of regulatory factors, the poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs). These highly conserved polypeptides are found only in eukaryotes; single-celled eukaryotes each have a single PABP, whereas humans have five and Arabidopis has eight. They typically bind poly(A) using one or more RNA-recognition motifs, globular domains common to numerous other eukaryotic RNA-binding proteins. Although they lack catalytic activity, PABPs have several roles in mediating gene expression. Nuclear PABPs are necessary for the synthesis of the poly(A) tail, regulating its ultimate length and stimulating maturation of the mRNA. Association with PABP is also a requirement for some mRNAs to be exported from the nucleus. In the cytoplasm, PABPs facilitate the formation of the 'closed loop' structure of the messenger ribonucleoprotein particle that is crucial for additional PABP activities that promote translation initiation and termination, recycling of ribosomes, and stability of the mRNA. Collectively, these sequential nuclear and cytoplasmic contributions comprise a cycle in which PABPs and the poly(A) tail first create and then eliminate a network of cis- acting interactions that control mRNA function.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Genome Biol. 2003;4(7):223. Epub 2003 Jul 1. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal Title

Genome biology

PubMed ID

12844354

Share

COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.