UMMS Affiliation

Department of Neurology

Publication Date

9-15-2017

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Animal Sciences | Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities | Genetics and Genomics | Nervous System Diseases | Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases

Abstract

GM1 gangliosidosis is a fatal lysosomal disorder, for which there is no effective treatment. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy in GM1 cats has resulted in a greater than 6-fold increase in lifespan, with many cats remaining alive at > 5.7 years of age, with minimal clinical signs. Glycolipids are the principal storage product in GM1 gangliosidosis whose pathogenic mechanism is not completely understood. Targeted lipidomics analysis was performed to better define disease mechanisms and identify markers of disease progression for upcoming clinical trials in humans. 36 sphingolipids and subspecies associated with ganglioside biosynthesis were tested in the cerebrospinal fluid of untreated GM1 cats at a humane endpoint ( approximately 8 months), AAV-treated GM1 cats ( approximately 5 years old), and normal adult controls. In untreated GM1 cats, significant alterations were noted in 16 sphingolipid species, including gangliosides (GM1 and GM3), lactosylceramides, ceramides, sphingomyelins, monohexosylceramides, and sulfatides. Variable degrees of correction in many lipid metabolites reflected the efficacy of AAV gene therapy. Sphingolipid levels were highly predictive of neurologic disease progression, with 11 metabolites having a coefficient of determination (R(2)) > 0.75. Also, a specific detergent additive significantly increased the recovery of certain lipid species in cerebrospinal fluid samples. This report demonstrates the methodology and utility of targeted lipidomics to examine the pathophysiology of lipid storage disorders.

Keywords

AAV, GM1 gangliosidosis, adeno-associated virus, biomarkers, feline, gene therapy, lipidomics, neurologic disease

Rights and Permissions

Copyright 2017 The Author(s). This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license.

DOI of Published Version

10.1016/j.omtm.2017.07.005

Source

Mol Ther Methods Clin Dev. 2017 Jul 26;6:135-142. doi: 10.1016/j.omtm.2017.07.005. eCollection 2017 Sep 15. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Molecular therapy. Methods and clinical development

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

28808666

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

 
 

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