UMMS Affiliation

School of Medicine

Publication Date

3-1-2017

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Psychiatry and Psychology | Psychology | Social Psychology and Interaction

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Pervasive weight stigma and discrimination have led to ongoing calls for efforts to reduce this bias. Despite increasing research on stigma-reduction strategies, perspectives of individuals who have experienced weight stigma have rarely been included to inform this research. The present study conducted a systematic examination of women with high body weight to assess their perspectives about a broad range of strategies to reduce weight-based stigma.

METHODS: Women with overweight or obesity (N = 461) completed an online survey in which they evaluated the importance, feasibility and potential impact of 35 stigma-reduction strategies in diverse settings. Participants (91.5% who reported experiencing weight stigma) also completed self-report measures assessing experienced and internalized weight stigma.

RESULTS: Most participants assigned high importance to all stigma-reduction strategies, with school-based and healthcare approaches accruing the highest ratings. Adding weight stigma to existing anti-harassment workplace training was rated as the most impactful and feasible strategy. The family environment was viewed as an important intervention target, regardless of participants' experienced or internalized stigma.

CONCLUSION: These findings underscore the importance of including people with stigmatized identities in stigma-reduction research; their insights provide a necessary and valuable contribution that can inform ways to reduce weight-based inequities and prioritize such efforts.

Rights and Permissions

Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Citation: Obes Sci Pract. 2017 Mar;3(1):25-35. doi: 10.1002/osp4.101. Epub 2017 Feb 8. Link to article on publisher's site

DOI of Published Version

10.1002/osp4.101

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Keywords

Discrimination, stigma, weight bias

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Obesity science and practice

PubMed ID

28392929

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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