UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology

Date

8-24-2016

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Health Information Technology | Infectious Disease | Virus Diseases

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Early recognition and treatment of circulatory volume loss is essential in the clinical management of dengue viral infection. We hypothesized that a novel computational algorithm, originally developed for noninvasive monitoring of blood loss in combat casualties, could: (1) indicate the central volume status of children with dengue during the early stages of "shock"; and (2) track fluid resuscitation status.

METHODS: Continuous noninvasive photoplethysmographic waveforms were collected over a 5-month period from three children of Thai ethnicity with clinical suspicion of dengue. Waveform data were processed by the algorithm to calculate each child's Compensatory Reserve Index, where 1 represents supine normovolemia and 0 represents the circulatory volume at which hemodynamic decompensation occurs. Values between 1 and 0 indicate the proportion of reserve remaining before hemodynamic decompensation.

RESULTS: This case report describes a 7-year-old Thai boy, another 7-year-old Thai boy, and a 9-year-old Thai boy who exhibited signs and symptoms of dengue shock syndrome; all the children had secondary dengue virus infections, documented by serology and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The three boys experienced substantial plasma leakage demonstrated by pleural effusion index > 25, ascites, and > 20 % hemoconcentration. They received fluid administered intravenously; one received a blood transfusion. All three boys showed a significantly low initial Compensatory Reserve Index ( > /=0.20), indicating a clinical diagnosis of "near shock". Following 5 days with fluid resuscitation treatment, their Compensatory Reserve Index increased towards "normovolemia" (that is, Compensatory Reserve Index > 0.75).

CONCLUSIONS: The results from these cases demonstrate a new variation in the diagnostic capability to manage patients with dengue shock syndrome. The findings shed new light on a method that can avoid possible adverse effects of shock by noninvasive measurement of a patient's compensatory reserve rather than standard vital signs or invasive diagnostic methods.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: J Med Case Rep. 2016 Aug 24;10(1):233. doi: 10.1186/s13256-016-1019-z. Link to article on publisher's site

DOI of Published Version

10.1186/s13256-016-1019-z

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Keywords

Decision support, Dengue shock syndrome, Machine learning, Pulse oximetry

Journal Title

Journal of medical case reports

PubMed ID

27553703

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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