UMMS Affiliation

Department of Neurology; Department of Psychiatry, Brudnick Neuropsychiatric Research Institute

Publication Date

9-13-2016

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Cell Biology | Mental Disorders | Nervous System Diseases | Neurology | Neuroscience and Neurobiology | Psychiatry

Abstract

How mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) gene cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD) remains poorly understood. We generated and characterized multiple induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from patients with MAPT IVS10+16 and tau-A152T mutations and a control subject. In cortical neurons differentiated from these and other published iPSC lines, we found that MAPT mutations do not affect neuronal differentiation but increase the 4R/3R tau ratio. Patient neurons had significantly higher levels of MMP-9 and MMP-2 and were more sensitive to stress-induced cell death. Inhibitors of MMP-9/MMP-2 protected patient neurons from stress-induced cell death and recombinant MMP-9/MMP-2 were sufficient to decrease neuronal survival. In tau-A152T neurons, inhibition of the ERK pathway decreased MMP-9 expression. Moreover, ectopic expression of 4R but not 3R tau-A152T in HEK293 cells increased MMP-9 expression and ERK phosphorylation. These findings provide insights into the molecular pathogenesis of FTD and suggest a potential therapeutic target for FTD with MAPT mutations.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Stem Cell Reports. 2016 Sep 13;7(3):316-24. doi: 10.1016/j.stemcr.2016.08.006. Epub 2016 Sep 1. Link to article on publisher's site

DOI of Published Version

10.1016/j.stemcr.2016.08.006

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Keywords

MMP-2, MMP-9, frontotemporal dementia, iPSCs, neuronal survival, neurons, tau

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Stem cell reports

PubMed ID

27594586

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

 
 

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