UMMS Affiliation

Department of Neurology; Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Millennium PhD Program

Date

5-27-2016

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Cardiology | Cardiovascular Diseases | Nervous System Diseases | Neurology

Abstract

Warfarin is very effective in preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, its use is limited due to fear of hemorrhagic complications, unpredictable anticoagulant effects related to multiple drug interactions and dietary restrictions, a narrow therapeutic window, frequent difficulty maintaining the anticoagulant effect within a narrow therapeutic window, and the need for inconvenient monitoring. Several newer oral anticoagulants have been approved for primary and secondary prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. These agents have several advantages relative to warfarin therapy. As a group, these direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC), which include the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran, and the factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban), are more effective than dose adjusted warfarin for prevention of all-cause stroke (including both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke), and have an overall more favorable safety profile. Nevertheless, an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (with the exception of apixaban), increased risk for thrombotic complication with sudden discontinuation, and inability to accurately assess and reverse anticoagulant effect require consideration prior to therapy initiation, and pose a challenge for decision making in acute stroke therapy.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Open Cardiovasc Med J. 2016 May 27;10:94-104. doi: 10.2174/1874192401610010094. eCollection 2016. Link to article on publisher's site

DOI of Published Version

10.2174/1874192401610010094

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Keywords

Atrial fibrillation, hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, oral anticoagulation, outcome, review, therapy, thrombolysis

Journal Title

The open cardiovascular medicine journal

PubMed ID

27347226

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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