UMMS Affiliation

Department of Pathology

Publication Date

3-15-2016

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Cancer Biology | Neoplasms

Abstract

Mounting evidence suggests that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) can function as microRNA sponges and compete for microRNA binding to protein-coding transcripts. However, the prevalence, functional significance and targets of lncRNA-mediated sponge regulation of cancer are mostly unknown. Here we identify a lncRNA-mediated sponge regulatory network that affects the expression of many protein-coding prostate cancer driver genes, by integrating analysis of sequence features and gene expression profiles of both lncRNAs and protein-coding genes in tumours. We confirm the tumour-suppressive function of two lncRNAs (TUG1 and CTB-89H12.4) and their regulation of PTEN expression in prostate cancer. Surprisingly, one of the two lncRNAs, TUG1, was previously known for its function in polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated transcriptional regulation, suggesting its sub-cellular localization-dependent function. Our findings not only suggest an important role of lncRNA-mediated sponge regulation in cancer, but also underscore the critical influence of cytoplasmic localization on the efficacy of a sponge lncRNA.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Nat Commun. 2016 Mar 15;7:10982. doi: 10.1038/ncomms10982. Link to article on publisher's site

DOI of Published Version

10.1038/ncomms10982

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Keywords

Long non-coding RNAs, Medical research, Prostate cancer, Transcription

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Nature communications

PubMed ID

26975529

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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