UMMS Affiliation

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Massachusetts Medical Center

Publication Date

3-31-2016

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Clinical Epidemiology | Epidemiology | Health Services Administration | Orthopedics | Surgery

Abstract

Total elbow arthroplasty (TEA) is utilized in the treatment of rheumatoid and post-traumatic elbow arthritis. TEA is a relatively low volume surgery in comparison to other types of arthroplasty and therefore little is known about current surgical utilization, patient demographics and complication rates in the United States. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the current practice trends and associated in-patient complications of TEA at academic centers in the United States. We queried the University Health Systems Consortium administrative database from 2007 to 2011 for patients who underwent an elective TEA. A descriptive analysis of demographics was performed which included patient age, sex, race, and insurance status. We also evaluated the following patient clinical benchmarks: hospital length of stay (LOS), hospital direct cost, in-hospital mortality, complications, and 30-day readmission rates. Our cohort consisted of 3146 adult patients (36.5% male and 63.5% female) with an average age of 58 years who underwent a total elbow arthroplasty (159 academic medical centers) in the United States. The racial demographics included 2334 (74%) Caucasian, 285 (9%) black, 236 (7.5%) Hispanic, 16 (0.5%) Asian, and 283 (9%) other patients. The mean LOS was 4.2+/-5 days and the mean total direct cost for the hospital was 16,300+/-4000 US Dollars per case. The overall inpatient complication rate was 3.1% and included mortality < 1%, DVT (0.8%), re-operation (0.5%), and infection (0.4%). The 30-day readmission rate was 4.4%. TEA is a relatively uncommon surgery in comparison to other forms of arthroplasty but is associated with low in-patient and 30-day perioperative complication rate. Additionally, the 30-day readmission rate and overall hospital costs are comparable to the traditional total hip and knee arthroplasty surgeries.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Orthop Rev (Pavia). 2016 Mar 31;8(1):6113. doi: 10.4081/or.2016.6113. eCollection 2016. Link to article on publisher's site

DOI of Published Version

10.4081/or.2016.6113

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Keywords

Total elbow arthroplasty, United States, complications, in-patient trend, insurance, readmission

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Orthopedic reviews

PubMed ID

27114806

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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