UMMS Affiliation

Gene Therapy Center; Department of Neurology; Vector Core; Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Pulmonology

Publication Date

1-1-2016

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Genetics and Genomics | Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience | Nervous System Diseases | Therapeutics

Abstract

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease; survival in ALS is typically 3-5 years. No treatment extends patient survival by more than three months. Approximately 20% of familial ALS and 1-3% of sporadic ALS patients carry a mutation in the gene encoding superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). In a transgenic ALS mouse model expressing the mutant SOD1(G93A) protein, silencing the SOD1 gene prolongs survival. One study reports a therapeutic effect of silencing the SOD1 gene in systemically treated adult ALS mice; this was achieved with a short hairpin RNA, a silencing molecule that has raised multiple safety concerns, and recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) 9. We report here a silencing method based on an artificial microRNA termed miR-SOD1 systemically delivered using adeno-associated virus rAAVrh10, a serotype with a demonstrated safety profile in CNS clinical trials. Silencing of SOD1 in adult SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice with this construct profoundly delayed both disease onset and death in the SOD1(G93A) mice, and significantly preserved muscle strength and motor and respiratory functions. We also document that intrathecal delivery of the same rAAVrh10-miR-SOD1 in nonhuman primates significantly and safely silences SOD1 in lower motor neurons. This study supports the view that rAAVrh10-miR-SOD1 merits further development for the treatment of SOD1-linked ALS in humans.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Hum Gene Ther. 2016 Jan;27(1):19-31. doi: 10.1089/hum.2015.122. Link to article on publisher's site

Copyright © Florie Borel, et al., 2016; Published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. This Open Access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and the source are credited.

DOI of Published Version

10.1089/hum.2015.122

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Human gene therapy

PubMed ID

26710998

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

 
 

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