UMMS Affiliation

Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Department of Medicine

Publication Date

2-4-2016

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Clinical Epidemiology | Epidemiology | Immunology and Infectious Disease | International Public Health | Virus Diseases

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The mean age of dengue has been increasing in some but not all countries. We sought to determine the incidence of dengue virus (DENV) infection in adults and children in a prospective cohort study in the Philippines where dengue is hyperendemic.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A prospective cohort of subjects > /=6 months old in Cebu City, Philippines, underwent active community-based surveillance for acute febrile illnesses by weekly contact. Fever history within the prior seven days was evaluated with an acute illness visit followed by 2, 5, and 8-day, and 3-week convalescent visits. Blood was collected at the acute and 3-week visits. Scheduled visits took place at enrolment and 12 months that included blood collections. Acute samples were tested by DENV PCR and acute/convalescent samples by DENV IgM/IgG ELISA to identify symptomatic infections. Enrolment and 12-month samples were tested by DENV hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) assay to identify subclinical infections. Of 1,008 enrolled subjects, 854 completed all study activities at 12 months per-protocol undergoing 868 person-years of surveillance. The incidence of symptomatic and subclinical infections was 1.62 and 7.03 per 100 person-years, respectively. However, in subjects > 15 years old, only one symptomatic infection occurred whereas 27 subclinical infections were identified. DENV HAI seroprevalence increased sharply with age with baseline multitypic HAIs associated with fewer symptomatic infections. Using a catalytic model, the historical infection rate among dengue naive individuals was estimated to be high at 11-22%/year.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this hyperendemic area with high seroprevalence of multitypic DENV HAIs in adults, symptomatic dengue rarely occurred in individuals older than 15 years. Our findings demonstrate that dengue is primarily a pediatric disease in areas with high force of infection. However, the average age of dengue could increase if force of infection decreases over time, as is occurring in some hyperendemic countries such as Thailand.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2016 Feb 4;10(2):e0004337. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0004337. eCollection 2016. Link to article on publisher's site

This is an open access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.

DOI of Published Version

10.1371/journal.pntd.0004337

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal/Book/Conference Title

PLoS neglected tropical diseases

PubMed ID

26845762

 
 

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