UMMS Affiliation

Department of Molecular Medicine; Diabetes Center of Excellence; Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology

Date

9-10-2015

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques and Equipment | Biotechnology | Hematology | Immunopathology

Abstract

In vivo implantation of sterile materials and devices results in a foreign body immune response leading to fibrosis of implanted material. Neutrophils, one of the first immune cells to be recruited to implantation sites, have been suggested to contribute to the establishment of the inflammatory microenvironment that initiates the fibrotic response. However, the precise numbers and roles of neutrophils in response to implanted devices remains unclear. Using a mouse model of peritoneal microcapsule implantation, we show 30-500 fold increased neutrophil presence in the peritoneal exudates in response to implants. We demonstrate that these neutrophils secrete increased amounts of a variety of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Further, we observe that they participate in the foreign body response through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) on implant surfaces. Our results provide new insight into neutrophil function during a foreign body response to peritoneal implants which has implications for the development of biologically compatible medical devices.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: PLoS One. 2015 Sep 10;10(9):e0137550. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0137550. eCollection 2015. Link to article on publisher's site

DOI of Published Version

10.1371/journal.pone.0137550

Comments

Copyright: © 2015 Jhunjhunwala et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal Title

PloS one

PubMed ID

26355958

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.