UMMS Affiliation

Department of Psychiatry; Systems and Psychosocial Advances Research Center

Publication Date

4-2-2015

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms | Psychiatric and Mental Health | Psychiatry | Religion | Substance Abuse and Addiction

Abstract

Data from emerging adults (ages 18-29, N = 900) in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication Study was used to examine the influence of childhood and emerging adult religiosity and religious-based decision-making, and childhood adversity, on alcohol use. Childhood religiosity was protective against early alcohol use and progression to later abuse or dependence, but did not significantly offset the influence of childhood adversity on early patterns of heavy drinking in adjusted logistic regression models. Religiosity in emerging adulthood was negatively associated with alcohol use disorders. Protective associations for religiosity varied by gender, ethnicity and childhood adversity histories. Higher religiosity may be protective against early onset alcohol use and later development of alcohol problems, thus, should be considered in prevention programming for youth, particularly in faith-based settings. Mental health providers should allow for integration of clients' religiosity and spirituality beliefs and practices in treatment settings if clients indicate such interest.

Comments

Citation: Porche MV, Fortuna LR, Wachholtz A, Stone RT. Distal and Proximal Religiosity as Protective Factors for Adolescent and Emerging Adult Alcohol Use. Religions (Basel). 2015;6(2):365-384. PubMed PMID: 26146565; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4486303. Link to article on publisher's site

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Keywords

addiction, adolescence, alcohol use, childhood adversity, emerging adulthood, religion, spirituality

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Religions

PubMed ID

26146565

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

 
 

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