UMMS Affiliation

Department of Quantitative Health Sciences

Date

4-22-2014

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Epidemiology | Nervous System Diseases | Substance Abuse and Addiction | Women's Health

Abstract

Background. In multiple sclerosis (MS), symptom management and improved health-related quality of life (HrQOL) may be modified by smoking.

Objective. To evaluate the extent to which smoking is associated with worsened health outcomes and HrQOL for postmenopausal women with MS.

Methods. We identified 251 Women's Health Initiative Observational Study participants with a self-reported MS diagnosis. Using a linear model, we estimated changes from baseline to 3 years for activities of daily living, total metabolic equivalent tasks (MET) hours per week, mental and physical component scales (MCS, PCS) of the SF-36, and menopausal symptoms adjusting for years since menopause and other confounders.

Results. Nine percent were current and 50% past smokers. Age at smoking initiation was associated with significant changes in MCS during menopause. PCS scores were unchanged. While women who had ever smoked experienced an increase in physical activity during menopause, the physical activity levels of women who never smoked declined. Residual confounding may explain this finding. Smoking was not associated with change in menopausal symptoms during the 3-year follow-up.

Conclusion. Smoking was not associated with health outcomes among post-menopausal women with MS.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Mult Scler Int. 2014;2014:686045. doi: 10.1155/2014/686045. Epub 2014 Apr 22. Link to article on publisher's site

DOI of Published Version

10.1155/2014/686045

Comments

Copyright © 2014 Rachel Jawahar et al.

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal Title

Multiple sclerosis international

PubMed ID

24860668

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

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