UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine

Date

11-13-2014

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Bacterial Infections and Mycoses | Endocrine System Diseases | Immunology of Infectious Disease | Respiratory Tract Diseases

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB)--Type 2 diabetes mellitus co-morbidity. However, the cytokine interactions that characterize PTB coincident with pre-diabetes (PDM) are not known.

METHODS: To identify the influence of coincident PDM on cytokine levels in PTB, we examined circulating levels of a panel of cytokines in the plasma of individuals with TB-PDM and compared them with those without PDM (TB-NDM).

RESULTS: TB-PDM is characterized by elevated circulating levels of Type 1 (IFNgamma, TNFalpha and IL-2), Type 17 (IL-17A and IL-17F) and other pro-inflammatory (IL-1beta, IFNbeta and GM-CSF) cytokines. TB-PDM is also characterized by increased systemic levels of Type 2 (IL-5) and regulatory (IL-10 and TGFbeta) cytokines. Moreover, TB antigen stimulated whole blood also showed increased levels of pro-inflammatory (IFNgamma, TNFalpha and IL-1beta) cytokines as well. However, the cytokines did not exhibit any significant correlation with HbA1C levels or with bacterial burdens.

CONCLUSION: Our data reveal that pre-diabetes in PTB individuals is characterized by heightened cytokine responsiveness, indicating that a balanced pro and anti - inflammatory cytokine milieu is a feature of pre-diabetes--TB co-morbidity.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: PLoS One. 2014 Nov 13;9(11):e112108. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0112108. eCollection 2014. Link to article on publisher's site

DOI of Published Version

10.1371/journal.pone.0112108

Comments

This is an open-access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal Title

PloS one

PubMed ID

25393696

 
 

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