UMMS Affiliation

Department of Microbiology and Physiological Systems

Date

10-16-2014

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Bacterial Infections and Mycoses | Immunity | Immunology and Infectious Disease | Immunoprophylaxis and Therapy | Microbiology | Pathogenic Microbiology

Abstract

Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is associated with a spectrum of clinical outcomes, from long-term latent infection to different manifestations of progressive disease. Pro-inflammatory pathways, such as those controlled by IL-1beta, have the contrasting potential both to prevent disease by restricting bacterial replication, and to promote disease by inflicting tissue damage. Thus, the ultimate contribution of individual inflammatory pathways to the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection remains ambiguous. In this study, we identified a naturally-occurring polymorphism in the human IL1B promoter region, which alters the association of the C/EBPbeta and PU.1 transcription factors and controls Mtb-induced IL-1beta production. The high-IL-1beta expressing genotype was associated with the development of active tuberculosis, the severity of pulmonary disease and poor treatment outcome in TB patients. Higher IL-1beta expression did not suppress the activity of IFN-gamma-producing T cells, but instead correlated with neutrophil accumulation in the lung. These observations support a specific role for IL-1beta and granulocytic inflammation as a driver of TB disease progression in humans, and suggest novel strategies for the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: PLoS Pathog. 2014 Oct 16;10(10):e1004426. doi: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1004426. eCollection 2014. Link to article on publisher's site

DOI of Published Version

10.1371/journal.ppat.1004426

Comments

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal Title

PLoS pathogens

PubMed ID

25329476

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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