UMMS Affiliation

Department of Quantitative Health Sciences

Publication Date

11-14-2012

Document Type

Article

Subjects

Patient Compliance; Self Report; Validation Studies

Disciplines

Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms | Epidemiology | Health Services Research | Public Health

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Adherences to treatments that require a behavioral action often rely on self-reported recall, yet it is vital to determine whether real time self reporting of adherence using a simple logbook accurately captures adherence. The purpose of this study was to determine whether real time self-reported adherence is an accurate measurement of device usage during a clinical trial by comparing it to electronic recording.

METHODS: Using data collected from older adult men and women (N=135, mean age 82.3 yrs; range 66 to 98 yrs) participating in a clinical trial evaluating a vibrating platform for the treatment of osteoporosis, daily adherence to platform treatment was monitored using both self-reported written logs and electronically recorded radio-frequency identification card usage, enabling a direct comparison of the two methods over one year. Agreement between methods was also evaluated after stratification by age, gender, time in study, and cognition status.

RESULTS: The two methods were in high agreement (overall intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.96). The agreement between the two methods did not differ between age groups, sex, time in study and cognitive function.

CONCLUSIONS: Using a log book to report adherence to a daily intervention requiring a behavioral action in older adults is an accurate and simple approach to use in clinical trials, as evidenced by the high degree of concordance with an electronic monitor.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2012 Nov 14;12:171. doi: 10.1186/1471-2288-12-171. Link to article on publisher's site

DOI of Published Version

10.1186/1471-2288-12-171

Comments

© 2012 Jeffrey et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal/Book/Conference Title

BMC medical research methodology

PubMed ID

23150931

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