UMMS Affiliation

Program in Bioinformatics and Integrative Biology; Department of Medicine, Division of Transfusion Medicine

Publication Date

1-1-2013

Document Type

Article

Subjects

Short Interspersed Nucleotide Elements

Disciplines

Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology | Cell and Developmental Biology | Genetics and Genomics | Molecular Biology

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Errors during meiosis that affect synapsis and recombination between homologous chromosomes contribute to aneuploidy and infertility in humans. Despite the clinical relevance of these defects, we know very little about the mechanisms by which homologous chromosomes interact with one another during mammalian meiotic prophase. Further, we remain ignorant of the way in which chromosomal DNA complexes with the meiosis-specific structure that tethers homologs, the synaptonemal complex (SC), and whether specific DNA elements are necessary for this interaction.

RESULTS: In the present study we utilized chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and DNA sequencing to demonstrate that the axial elements of the mammalian SC are markedly enriched for a specific family of interspersed repeats, short interspersed elements (SINEs). Further, we refine the role of the repeats to specific sub-families of SINEs, B1 in mouse and AluY in old world monkey (Macaca mulatta).

CONCLUSIONS: Because B1 and AluY elements are the most actively retrotransposing SINEs in mice and rhesus monkeys, respectively, our observations imply that they may serve a dual function in axial element binding; i.e., as the anchoring point for the SC but possibly also as a suppressor/regulator of retrotransposition.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Mol Cytogenet. 2013 Jan 1;6(1):1. doi: 10.1186/1755-8166-6-1. Link to article on publisher's site

DOI of Published Version

10.1186/1755-8166-6-1

Comments

© 2013 Johnson et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Molecular cytogenetics

PubMed ID

23276256

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