PubMed ID

22039448

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology

Date

10-19-2011

Document Type

Article

Subjects

Animals; Cryptococcus neoformans; Mice; Mice, Knockout; Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88; Receptors, Interleukin-1; Receptors, Interleukin-18; Toll-Like Receptor 9

Disciplines

Immunology and Infectious Disease | Life Sciences | Medicine and Health Sciences

Abstract

Signaling via the adapter protein, MyD88, is important in the host defense against Cryptococcus neoformans infection. While certain Toll-like receptors (TLRs) can enhance the clearance of Cryptococcus, the contributions of MyD88-dependent, TLR-independent pathways have not been fully investigated. We examined the roles of IL-1R and IL-18R in vivo by challenging C57BL/6 mice with a lethal strain of Cryptococcus. We found that the absence of IL-18R, but not IL-1R, causes a shift in the survival curve following pulmonary delivery of a virulent strain of C. neoformans (H99). Specifically, IL-18R-deficient mice have significantly shorter median survival times compared to wild-type mice following infection. Cytokine analysis of lung homogenates revealed that deficiency of IL-IR, IL-18R, or MyD88 is associated with diminished lung levels of IL-1beta. In order to compare these findings with those related to TLR-deficiency, we studied the effects of TLR9-deficiency and found that deficiency of TLR9 also affects the survival curve of mice following challenge with C. neoformans. Yet the lungs from infected TLR9-deficient mice have robust levels of IL-1beta. In summary, we found that multiple signaling components can contribute the MyD88-dependent host responses to cryptococcal infection in vivo and each drives distinct pulmonary responses.

Comments

Citation: Wang JP, Lee CK, Akalin A, Finberg RW, Levitz SM (2011) Contributions of the MyD88-Dependent Receptors IL-18R, IL-1R, and TLR9 to Host Defenses following Pulmonary Challenge with Cryptococcus neoformans. PLoS ONE 6(10): e26232. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0026232. Link to article on publisher's site

Copyright: © 2011 Wang et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed