PubMed ID

21666805

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology

Date

6-7-2011

Document Type

Article

Subjects

DNA Replication Timing; DNA Topoisomerases, Type I; Genes, Fungal; Histones; Inheritance Patterns; Kinetics; Models, Biological; Mutation; Nucleosomes; Protein Processing, Post-Translational; Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins; Saccharomycetales; Transcription, Genetic

Disciplines

Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology | Life Sciences | Medicine and Health Sciences

Abstract

Replicating chromatin involves disruption of histone-DNA contacts and subsequent reassembly of maternal histones on the new daughter genomes. In bulk, maternal histones are randomly segregated to the two daughters, but little is known about the fine details of this process: do maternal histones re-assemble at preferred locations or close to their original loci? Here, we use a recently developed method for swapping epitope tags to measure the disposition of ancestral histone H3 across the yeast genome over six generations. We find that ancestral H3 is preferentially retained at the 5' ends of most genes, with strongest retention at long, poorly transcribed genes. We recapitulate these observations with a quantitative model in which the majority of maternal histones are reincorporated within 400 bp of their pre-replication locus during replication, with replication-independent replacement and transcription-related retrograde nucleosome movement shaping the resulting distributions of ancestral histones. We find a key role for Topoisomerase I in retrograde histone movement during transcription, and we find that loss of Chromatin Assembly Factor-1 affects replication-independent turnover. Together, these results show that specific loci are enriched for histone proteins first synthesized several generations beforehand, and that maternal histones re-associate close to their original locations on daughter genomes after replication. Our findings further suggest that accumulation of ancestral histones could play a role in shaping histone modification patterns.

Comments

Citation: Radman-Livaja M, Verzijlbergen KF, Weiner A, van Welsem T, Friedman N, et al. (2011) Patterns and Mechanisms of Ancestral Histone Protein Inheritance in Budding Yeast. PLoS Biol 9(6): e1001075. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1001075. Link to article on publisher's site

Copyright: © 2011 Radman-Livaja et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.