UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology

Date

5-2-2011

Document Type

Article

Subjects

Adolescent; Adult; Female; Hepatitis B; Hepatitis B virus; Humans; Interferon-gamma; Killer Cells, Natural; Male; Middle Aged; Natural Killer T-Cells; T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic; Young Adult

Disciplines

Immunology and Infectious Disease | Life Sciences | Medicine and Health Sciences

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The goal of this study is to observe changes in HBcAg-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), natural killer (NK) and natural killer T (NKT) cells from peripheral blood and to relate such changes on viral clearance and liver injury in patients with acute hepatitis B (AHB).

METHODS: Dynamic profiles on the frequency of HLA-A0201-restricted HBcAg18-27 pentamer complex (MHC-Pentamer)-specific CTLs and lymphocyte subsets in AHB patients were analyzed in addition to liver function tests, HBV serological markers, and HBV DNA levels. ELISPOT was used to detect interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) secretion in specific CTLs stimulated with known T cell epitope peptides associated with HBV surface protein, polymerase, and core protein.

RESULTS: HBV-specific CTL frequencies in AHB patients were much higher than in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) (p

CONCLUSIONS: Patients with AHB possess a higher frequency of HBcAg-specific CTLs than CHB patients. The frequency of specific CTLs in AHB patients is correlated with HBeAg clearance indicating that HBV-specific CTLs play an important role in viral clearance and the self-limited process of the disease. Furthermore, NK and NKT cells are likely involved in the early, non-specific immune response to clear the virus.

Comments

Citation: Virol J. 2011 May 2;8:199. Link to article on publisher's site

© 2011 Li et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed