UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine

Publication Date

5-28-2005

Document Type

Article

Subjects

AIDS Vaccines; Animals; DNA, Recombinant; HIV Antibodies; HIV Envelope Protein gp120; HIV Infections; HIV-1; Humans; Immunization; Neutralization Tests; Rabbits; Vaccines, DNA

Disciplines

Life Sciences | Medicine and Health Sciences

Abstract

Strategies are needed for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 vaccine development that improves the neutralizing antibody response against primary isolates of the virus. Here we examined recombinant DNA priming followed by subunit protein boosting as a strategy to generate neutralizing antibodies. Both plasmid-based and recombinant protein envelope (Env) glycoprotein immunogens were derived from a primary viral isolate, JR-FL. Serum from rabbits immunized with either gp120 or gp140 DNA vaccines delivered by gene gun inoculation followed by recombinant gp120 protein boosting was capable of neutralizing JR-FL. Neither the DNA vaccines alone nor the gp120 protein alone generated a detectable neutralizing antibody response against this virus. Neutralizing antibody responses using gp120 DNA and gp140 DNA for priming were similar. The results suggest that Env DNA priming followed by gp120 protein boosting provides an advantage over either approach alone for generating a detectable neutralizing antibody response against primary isolates that are not easily neutralized.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: J Virol. 2005 Jun;79(12):7933-7. Link to article on publisher's site

DOI of Published Version

10.1128/JVI.79.12.7933-7937.2005

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of virology

PubMed ID

15919951

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