UMMS Affiliation

Department of Clinical Microbiology

Publication Date

9-1-1987

Document Type

Article

Subjects

Ampicillin; Ampicillin Resistance; Culture Media; Haemophilus influenzae; Humans; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Regression Analysis; beta-Lactamases

Disciplines

Medical Microbiology

Abstract

A total of 114 strains of Haemophilus influenza were characterized with respect to beta-lactamase production and ampicillin MIC. Of this total, 41 strains produced a TEM-type beta-lactamase, and ampicillin MICs for these strains were greater than or equal to 2.0 microgram/ml. It was found that 54 strains lacked TEM-type beta-lactamase activity, and ampicillin MICs for them were less than or equal to 0.5 microgram/ml. The remaining 19 strains were beta-lactamase negative, but ampicillin MICs were greater than or equal to 2.0 micrograms/ml. Disk diffusion susceptibility tests were performed with two media, i.e., Mueller-Hinton agar containing 1.0% hemoglobin and 1.0% IsoVitaleX supplement (CHOC-MHA) and enriched chocolate agar (CHOC), by using disks containing 10 and 2 micrograms of ampicillin. If strains of H. influenzae for which ampicillin MICs were greater than or equal to 2.0 micrograms/ml were considered resistant, while strains for which MICs were less than or equal to 0.5 microgram/ml were considered susceptible, the following zone diameter interpretive criteria were identified as indicating ampicillin susceptibility: CHOC-MHA (10-micrograms disks), greater than or equal to 20 mm; CHOC-MHA (2-micrograms disks), greater than or equal to 17 mm; CHOC (10-micrograms disks), greater than or equal to 25 mm; and CHOC (2-micrograms disks), greater than or equal to 20 mm. In all cases, zones of inhibition less than those listed above would be interpreted as indicating resistance. Each of these four combinations was found to be essentially equivalent in identifying susceptible and resistant strains of H. influenzae, irrespective of beta-lactamase production.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: J Clin Microbiol. 1987 Sep;25(9):1675-8.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of clinical microbiology

PubMed ID

3498738

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