UMMS Affiliation

Department of Neurobiology; Reppert Lab

Date

6-24-2014

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Neuroscience and Neurobiology

Abstract

Convincing evidence that migrant monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) use a magnetic compass to aid their fall migration has been lacking from the spectacular navigational capabilities of this species. Here we use flight simulator studies to show that migrants indeed possess an inclination magnetic compass to help direct their flight equatorward in the fall. The use of this inclination compass is light-dependent utilizing ultraviolet-A/blue light between 380 and 420 nm. Notably, the significance of light monarchs, the inclination compass may serve as an important orientation mechanism when directional daylight cues are unavailable and may also augment time-compensated sun compass orientation for appropriate directionality throughout the migration.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Nat Commun. 2014 Jun 24;5:4164. doi: 10.1038/ncomms5164. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Keywords

Animal migration, Animal physiology

PubMed ID

24960099

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

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