UMMS Affiliation

Department of Cell Biology

Date

9-12-2002

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Actinin; Animals; Binding Sites; Calcium; Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 2; Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases; Cells, Cultured; Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5; Cyclin-Dependent Kinases; Excitatory Amino Acid Agonists; Glutathione Transferase; Macromolecular Substances; Mice; Nerve Tissue Proteins; Neurons; Protein Binding; Protein Structure, Tertiary; Protein Subunits; Rats; Rats, Sprague-Dawley; Receptors, Glutamate; Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate; Recombinant Fusion Proteins; Signal Transduction; Two-Hybrid System Techniques

Disciplines

Cell Biology

Abstract

Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a critical regulator of neuronal migration in the developing CNS, and recent studies have revealed a role for Cdk5 in synaptogenesis and regulation of synaptic transmission. Deregulation of Cdk5 has been linked to the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Activation of Cdk5 requires its association with a regulatory subunit, and two Cdk5 activators, p35 and p39, have been identified. To gain further insight into the functions of Cdk5, we identified proteins that interact with p39 in a yeast two-hybrid screen. In this study we report that alpha-actinin-1 and the alpha-subunit of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKIIalpha), two proteins localized at the postsynaptic density, interact with Cdk5 via their association with p35 and p39. CaMKIIalpha and alpha-actinin-1 bind to distinct regions of p35 and p39 and also can interact with each other. The association of CaMKIIalpha and alpha-actinin-1 to the Cdk5 activators, as well as to each other, is stimulated by calcium. Further, the activation of glutamate receptors increases the association of p35 and p39 with CaMKIIalpha, and the inhibition of CaMKII activation diminishes this effect. The glutamate-mediated increase in association of p35 and CaMKIIalpha is mediated in large part by NMDA receptors, suggesting that cross talk between the Cdk5 and CaMKII signal transduction pathways may be a component of the complex molecular mechanisms contributing to synaptic plasticity, memory, and learning.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: J Neurosci. 2002 Sep 15;22(18):7879-91. Link to article on publisher's website

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

12223541

Included in

Cell Biology Commons

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