UMMS Affiliation

Meyers Primary Care Institute

Date

1-21-2014

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Female Urogenital Diseases and Pregnancy Complications | Male Urogenital Diseases | Nephrology | Organic Chemicals | Therapeutics

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Pegloticase is approved in the US for treatment of refractory chronic gout. Since chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common in these patients, we conducted a post-hoc analysis of 2 replicate phase 3 trials and the subsequent open-label extension study to determine the effects of pegloticase on renal function in patients with CKD stages 3 and 4, as well as the effects of renal dysfunction on pegloticase efficacy and safety.

FINDINGS: Patients with renal insufficiency were randomized to pegloticase 8 mg every 2 weeks (n = 42), pegloticase 8 mg every 4 weeks (n = 41), or placebo (n = 20) for 6 months as defined by the study protocols. Renal function was assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). All patients completing the randomized trials could participate in an open-label extension study for a further 2.5 years. Uric acid response, the primary end point in the trials, was plasma uric acid < 6.0 mg/dl for 80% of months 3 and 6.Mean eGFR in both pegloticase dosing cohorts remained constant over the randomized treatment phase and long-term open-label extension study. The number of patients achieving uric acid response was similar across CKD stages (32% stage 1, 23% stage 2, 35% stage 3, and 39% stage 4, respectively, P = 0.3). There was no difference in the pegloticase safety profile based on CKD stage.

CONCLUSIONS: Pegloticase treatment does not impact eGFR in CKD patients and response to pegloticase is independent of CKD stage.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinical trial identifier: NCT00325195.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: BMC Res Notes. 2014 Jan 21;7:54. doi: 10.1186/1756-0500-7-54. Link to article on publisher's site

Comments

Copyright © 2014 Yood et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

24447425

 
 

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