Title

Risk factors for a decline in upper body function following treatment for early stage breast cancer

UMMS Affiliation

Meyers Primary Care Institute

Date

3-16-1999

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Age Factors; Aged; Arm; Body Mass Index; Breast Neoplasms; Cohort Studies; Cross-Sectional Studies; Educational Status; Female; Heart Diseases; Humans; Logistic Models; Lung Diseases; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Muscle Weakness; Postoperative Complications; Risk Factors

Disciplines

Health Services Research | Primary Care

Abstract

PURPOSE: To identify risk factors for a decline in upper body function following treatment for early stage breast cancer.

METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional observational study of 213 women > 55 years of age newly diagnosed with early stage breast cancer interviewed three to five months following their definitive surgery. Patients were classified as having impaired upper body function related to their breast cancer treatment if: 1) they reported having no difficulty in performing any of three tasks requiring upper body function (pushing or pulling large objects; lifting objects weighing more than 10 pounds; and reaching or extending arms above shoulder level) prior to treatment, but reported that any of these tasks were somewhat or very difficult in the four weeks prior to interview, or 2) they reported that performing any of the three tasks requiring upper body function was somewhat difficult prior to treatment, but reported that any of these tasks were very difficult in the four weeks prior to interview.

RESULTS: In multiple logistic regression models, both the extent and type of primary tumor therapy and cardiopulmonary comorbidity were significantly associated with a decline in upper body function following breast cancer treatment.

CONCLUSION: Given the critical importance of upper body function in maintaining independent living, clinicians should consider the functional consequences of treatment when they discuss treatment options and post-operative care with older women who have early stage breast cancer.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Breast Cancer Res Treat. 1999 Mar;54(1):25-30. DOI: 10.1023/A:1006159720583

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

10369077