UMMS Affiliation

Department of Pediatrics

Date

7-11-2013

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Adolescent; Child; Cohort Studies; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1; Female; Health Behavior; Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated; Humans; Hyperglycemia; Hypoglycemia; Hypoglycemic Agents; Insulin; *Insulin Infusion Systems; Ketones; Male; Massachusetts; Parents; *Patient Education as Topic; Patient Medication Knowledge; Pilot Projects; Self-Assessment

Disciplines

Endocrine System Diseases | Endocrinology | Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism | Pediatrics

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to determine whether parental knowledge of the continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) device affects glycemic control as measured by hemoglobin A1c (A1C) level.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Parents of children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) using CSII completed a 14-item questionnaire. Questions 1-10 were knowledge-based questions that required the parent to extract specific information from their child's CSII device. Questions 11-14 asked parents to provide a self-assessment of their CSII knowledge.

RESULTS: Twenty-two parents of youth with T1DM participated in the study. Ten of the youth were in the Low-A1C group (A1C/=8%). Parents of youth in the Low-A1C group scored statistically better on the 10-item performance survey than parents of youth in the High-A1C group. Most of the parents of children in the Low-A1C group responded that they knew their child's insulin pump "very well" and that their pump knowledge had "increased" since their child started on the insulin pump.

CONCLUSIONS: Our findings reveal that youth with T1DM whose parents are more knowledgeable about pump functions have optimal glycemic control as evidenced by A1C. These findings underscore the importance of ongoing pump training for both pediatric patients and their parents.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Diabetes Technol Ther. 2013 Jul;15(7):591-5. doi: 10.1089/dia.2013.0031. Link to article on publisher's site.

Comments

This is a copy of an article published in Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics copyright 2013 Mary Ann Liebert Inc.; Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics is available online at http://online.liebertpub.com.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Keywords

UMCCTS funding

PubMed ID

23799273

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