Title

Insulin pump therapy in toddlers and preschool children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Pediatrics

Date

10-2002

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Child Welfare; Child, Preschool; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1; Diabetic Ketoacidosis; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug; Emergency Medical Services; Female; Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated; Humans; Hypoglycemic Agents; Infant; Infant Welfare; Insulin; *Insulin Infusion Systems; Male; North Carolina; Physicians; Severity of Illness Index; Treatment Outcome; Weight Gain

Disciplines

Cell Biology | Developmental Biology | Endocrinology

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To test whether glycemic control in young children could be achieved more effectively and safely by using continuous insulin infusions administered by insulin pumps.

STUDY DESIGN: We analyzed the effects of pump therapy in nine toddlers in whom type 1 diabetes developed between the ages of 10 and 40 months. After a mean of 13.7 months of therapy with multiple daily injections, patients were treated with insulin pumps for periods ranging from 7 to 19 months (mean, 12.7 months).

RESULTS: Before initiation of pump therapy, HbA1c levels averaged 9.5% +/- 0.4%, and patients had a mean of 0.52 episodes per month of severe hypoglycemia (uncontrolled shaking, inconsolable crying, disorientation, or seizures). After initiation of pump therapy, HbA1c levels declined to 7.9% +/- 0.3% (P 80%, reflecting increasing parental confidence and independence in diabetic care. Subjective assessments revealed significant improvements in quality of life and high levels of satisfaction with pump therapy.

CONCLUSIONS: Insulin pump therapy may provide an effective alternative for selected preschool children with type 1 diabetes.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: J Pediatr. 2002 Oct;141(4):490-5. Link to article on publisher's site

Comments

At the time of publication, Mary Lee was not yet affiliated with the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

12378187