Title

Colitis induced in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) is mediated by the NLRP3 inflammasome

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology

Date

5-6-2010

Document Type

Article

Subjects

Animals; Carrier Proteins; Caspase 1; Colitis; Dextran Sulfate; Disease Models, Animal; Inflammatory Bowel Diseases; Interleukin-1beta; Lysosomes; Macrophages; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Reactive Oxygen Species; Signal Transduction

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta) and IL-18 are central players in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In response to a variety of microbial components and crystalline substances, both cytokines are processed via the caspase-1-activating multiprotein complex, the NLRP3 inflammasome. Here, the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in experimental colitis induced by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) was examined.

METHODS: IL-1beta production in response to DSS was studied in macrophages of wild-type, caspase-1(-/-), NLRP3(-/-), ASC(-/-), cathepsin B(-/-) or cathepsin L(-/-) mice. Colitis was induced in C57BL/6 and NLRP3(-/-) mice by oral DSS administration. A clinical disease activity score was evaluated daily. Histological colitis severity and expression of cytokines were determined in colonic tissue.

RESULTS: Macrophages incubated with DSS in vitro secreted high levels of IL-1beta in a caspase-1-dependent manner. IL-1beta secretion was abrogated in macrophages lacking NLRP3, ASC or caspase-1, indicating that DSS activates caspase-1 via the NLRP3 inflammasome. Moreover, IL-1beta secretion was dependent on phagocytosis, lysosomal maturation, cathepsin B and L, and reactive oxygen species (ROS). After oral administration of DSS, NLRP3(-/-) mice developed a less severe colitis than wild-type mice and produced lower levels of proinflammatory cytokines in colonic tissue. Pharmacological inhibition of caspase-1 with pralnacasan achieved a level of mucosal protection comparable with NLRP3 deficiency.

CONCLUSIONS: The NLRP3 inflammasome was identified as a critical mechanism of intestinal inflammation in the DSS colitis model. The NLRP3 inflammasome may serve as a potential target for the development of novel therapeutics for patients with IBD.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Gut. 2010 Sep;59(9):1192-9. Epub 2010 May 4. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

20442201