Title

SARM regulates CCL5 production in macrophages by promoting the recruitment of transcription factors and RNA polymerase II to the Ccl5 promoter

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology

Publication Date

5-15-2014

Document Type

Article

Subjects

Animals; Armadillo Domain Proteins; Chemokine CCL2; Chemokine CCL5; Chemokine CXCL10; Cytoskeletal Proteins; Gene Expression Regulation; Interferon Regulatory Factors; Interleukin-1beta; Macrophages, Peritoneal; Mice; Mice, Knockout; NF-kappa B; Promoter Regions, Genetic; RNA Polymerase II; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha

Disciplines

Cells | Immunity | Immunology and Infectious Disease | Immunology of Infectious Disease | Infectious Disease

Abstract

The four Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor proteins MyD88, MAL, TRIF, and TRAM are well established as essential mediators of TLR signaling and gene induction following microbial detection. In contrast, the function of the fifth, most evolutionarily conserved Toll/IL-1R adaptor, sterile alpha and HEAT/Armadillo motif-containing protein (SARM), has remained more elusive. Recent studies of Sarm(-/-) mice have highlighted a role for SARM in stress-induced neuronal cell death and immune responses in the CNS. However, whether SARM has a role in immune responses in peripheral myeloid immune cells is less clear. Thus, we characterized TLR-induced cytokine responses in SARM-deficient murine macrophages and discovered a requirement for SARM in CCL5 production, whereas gene induction of TNF, IL-1beta, CCL2, and CXCL10 were SARM-independent. SARM was not required for TLR-induced activation of MAPKs or of transcription factors implicated in CCL5 induction, namely NF-kappaB and IFN regulatory factors, nor for Ccl5 mRNA stability or splicing. However, SARM was critical for the recruitment of transcription factors and of RNA polymerase II to the Ccl5 promoter. Strikingly, the requirement of SARM for CCL5 induction was not restricted to TLR pathways, as it was also apparent in cytosolic RNA and DNA responses. Thus, this study identifies a new role for SARM in CCL5 expression in macrophages.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: J Immunol. 2014 May 15;192(10):4821-32. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1302980. Epub 2014 Apr 7. Link to article on publisher's site

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950)

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

24711619