UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology

Publication Date

6-12-2013

Document Type

Article

Subjects

Animals; Anopheles; Brazil; Chromosomes, Insect; DNA Transposable Elements; Evolution, Molecular; Female; Genetic Variation; *Genome, Insect; Host-Parasite Interactions; Insect Proteins; Insect Vectors; Insecticide Resistance; Insecticides; Malaria; Male; Molecular Sequence Annotation; Phylogeny; Synteny; Transcriptome

Disciplines

Computational Biology | Genetics and Genomics | Genomics | Immunology and Infectious Disease | Parasitic Diseases

Abstract

Anopheles darlingi is the principal neotropical malaria vector, responsible for more than a million cases of malaria per year on the American continent. Anopheles darlingi diverged from the African and Asian malaria vectors approximately 100 million years ago (mya) and successfully adapted to the New World environment. Here we present an annotated reference A. darlingi genome, sequenced from a wild population of males and females collected in the Brazilian Amazon. A total of 10 481 predicted protein-coding genes were annotated, 72% of which have their closest counterpart in Anopheles gambiae and 21% have highest similarity with other mosquito species. In spite of a long period of divergent evolution, conserved gene synteny was observed between A. darlingi and A. gambiae. More than 10 million single nucleotide polymorphisms and short indels with potential use as genetic markers were identified. Transposable elements correspond to 2.3% of the A. darlingi genome. Genes associated with hematophagy, immunity and insecticide resistance, directly involved in vector-human and vector-parasite interactions, were identified and discussed. This study represents the first effort to sequence the genome of a neotropical malaria vector, and opens a new window through which we can contemplate the evolutionary history of anopheline mosquitoes. It also provides valuable information that may lead to novel strategies to reduce malaria transmission on the South American continent. The A. darlingi genome is accessible at www.labinfo.lncc.br/index.php/anopheles-darlingi.

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Nucleic acids research

Comments

Full author list omitted for brevity. For the full list of authors, see article.

Citation: Nucleic Acids Res. 2013 Aug;41(15):7387-400. doi: 10.1093/nar/gkt484. Link to article on publisher's site

Copyright The Author(s) 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

23761445

Share

COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.