UMMS Affiliation

Department of Cell and Developmental Biology



Document Type



Cell Biology | Cellular and Molecular Physiology | Molecular Biology


We recently reported that reducing the levels of BRG1, the catalytic subunit of mammalian SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzymes, induces alterations in nuclear shape in a breast epithelial cell line. Immunostaining the BRG1 knockdown cells with nuclear lamina antibodies revealed a significantly increased frequency of grooves, or invaginations, in the nuclei. Disruption of each of the major cytoplasmic filament systems (actin, tubulin and cytokeratins) had no impact on the BRG1-dependent changes in nuclear shape, indicating that the observed changes in nuclear morphology are unlikely to be a result of alterations in the integrity of the nuclear-cytoplamic contacts in the cell. We propose that the BRG1-dependent nuclear shape changes reflect a role for the chromatin remodeling enzyme in maintaining the structural integrity of the nucleus via global regulation of chromatin structure and dynamics within the nucleus.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Imbalzano AN, Imbalzano KM, Nickerson JA. BRG1, a SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzyme ATPase, is required for maintenance of nuclear shape and integrity. Commun Integr Biol. 2013 Sep 1;6(5):e25153. doi: 10.4161/cib.25153. Link to article on publisher's site


Addendum to: "Nuclear Shape Changes Are Induced by Knockdown of the SWI/SNF ATPase BRG1 and Are Independent of Cytoskeletal Connections" in PLoS One, volume 8, e55628.

Copyright 2013 Landes Bioscience. This is an open-access article licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License. The article may be redistributed, reproduced, and reused for non-commercial purposes, provided the original source is properly cited.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed


BRG1, SWI/SNF, chromatin remodeling, chromatin, lamina, nuclear shape, breast epithelia



To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.