Title

Hippocampal volume reduction in female but not male recent abstinent methamphetamine users

UMMS Affiliation

Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center; Department of Psychiatry

Date

8-1-2015

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Nervous System | Neuroscience and Neurobiology | Pharmacology | Psychiatry and Psychology | Substance Abuse and Addiction

Abstract

Growing evidence suggests abnormalities in brain morphology including hippocampal structure in patients with methamphetamine (MA) dependence. This study was performed to examine hippocampal volume in abstinent MA users, and to further explore its relationship with cognitive function. 30 abstinent MA users (20 males and 10 females) with average 5.52 months of duration of abstinence and 29 healthy controls (19 males and 10 females) age 18-45 years old were recruited for clinical assessment and imaging scan. FreeSurfer was used to segment the hippocampus bilaterally, and hippocampal volumes were extracted for group and gender comparisons. Cognitive function was measured using the CogState Battery Chinese language version (CSB-C). Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) controlling for education showed a significant group by gender interaction for the right hippocampal relative volume adjusted for total brain size (p=0.020); there was a significant difference between male controls and female controls (p < 0.001), but such a difference did not exist between male patients and female patients (p=0.203). No significant correlations were found between hippocampal volume and cognitive measures. There seems to be a gender difference in how MA affects hippocampal volume in abstinent MA users. Hippocampus might be an important treatment target for cognitive improvement and functional recovery in this patient population, especially in females.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Du J, Quan M, Zhuang W, Zhong N, Jiang H, Kennedy DN, Harrington A, Ziedonis D, Fan X, Zhao M. Hippocampal volume reduction in female but not male recent abstinent methamphetamine users. Behav Brain Res. 2015 Aug 1;289:78-83. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2015.04.033. Epub 2015 Apr 25. PubMed PMID: 25920682; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4441589. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

25920682