Title

Physical Activity Enjoyment, Perceived Barriers, and Beliefs Among Adolescents With and Without Intellectual Disabilities

UMMS Affiliation

Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center; Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center

Date

4-1-2015

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Community Health | Community Health and Preventive Medicine | Exercise Science | Mental Disorders | Psychiatry and Psychology

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Youth with intellectual disabilities (ID) exhibit low levels of physical activity, but the underlying contributors to behavior are unclear. We compared physical activity enjoyment, perceived barriers, beliefs, and self-efficacy among adolescents with ID and typically developing (TD) adolescents.

METHODS: A questionnaire was administered to 38 adolescents with ID (mean age 16.8 years) and 60 TD adolescents (mean age 15.3 years). Of the original 33 questionnaire items, 23 met the test-retest reliability criteria and were included in the group comparisons.

RESULTS: Fewer adolescents with ID reported that they have someone to do physical activity with (64% vs. 93%, p < 0.001), and a greater proportion of adolescents with ID perceived that physical activities were too hard to learn (41% vs. 0%, p < 0.001). Fewer adolescents with ID believed that physical activity is good for their health (92% vs. 100%, p=0.05). More adolescents with ID reported a dislike of individual physical activities (p=0.02). A large proportion of adolescents with ID (84%) responded that they were good at doing physical activities, but the difference between groups was only of borderline significance. (95% of TD adolescents, p=0.06).

CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents shared many of the same perceptions about physical activity, but some important differences between groups were identified.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Stanish HI, Curtin C, Must A, Phillips S, Maslin M, Bandini LG. Physical Activity Enjoyment, Perceived Barriers, and Beliefs Among Adolescents With and Without Intellectual Disabilities. J Phys Act Health. 2015 Apr 1. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 25830443. PubMed Central PMCID: NIHMS697578. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

25830443