Title

A 3D anthropometric analysis of the orolabial region in Chinese young adults

UMMS Affiliation

Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center; Department of Pediatrics; Shriver Center

Date

12-2013

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Adolescent; Adult; Anatomic Landmarks; Cephalometry; Chin; China; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Humans; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Imaging, Three-Dimensional; Lip; Male; Mouth; Patient Care Planning; Photogrammetry; Reference Values; Sex Factors; Young Adult

Disciplines

Body Regions | Diagnosis | Epidemiology | Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery | Stomatognathic System

Abstract

The orolabial region undergoes considerable changes after orthognathic surgery or orthodontic treatment. Ethnicity, age, and sex-specific norms are needed during the planning of interventions in this region. In 2008 the Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg published anthropometric measurements of the lips of Chinese children, but to our knowledge such reference data for young Chinese adults are not currently available. We therefore used digital anthropometry on 3-dimensional craniofacial images acquired from 103 healthy young Chinese adults with Class I skeletal pattern. Anthropometric landmarks were identified, which provided linear and angular measurements. All orolabial measurements were significantly larger in men than women, with the exception of the labiomental angle. In contrast, there were no sex differences in the anthropometric proportions. We therefore provide what we think are the first cross-sectional norms available for young Chinese adults. These norms can be used to evaluate the morphology of the lips objectively for preoperative diagnosis, planning of treatment, and assessment of postoperative outcomes. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Jayaratne YS, Deutsch CK, Zwahlen RA. A 3D anthropometric analysis of the orolabial region in Chinese young adults. Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2013 Dec;51(8):908-12. doi: 10.1016/j.bjoms.2013.09.002. Epub 2013 Oct 3. PubMed PMID: 24094549; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4104960. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID

24094549