GSBS Student Publications

Student Author(s)

James Ashley; Bulent Ataman

GSBS Program

Neuroscience

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Neurobiology; Budnik Lab; Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Neuroscience Program

Date

6-25-2005

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Animals; Animals, Genetically Modified; Cell Adhesion Molecules, Neuronal; Drosophila Proteins; Drosophila melanogaster; Neuromuscular Junction; RNA Interference; Restriction Mapping; Synapses; Transfection

Disciplines

Neuroscience and Neurobiology

Abstract

Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) have been universally recognized for their essential roles during synapse remodeling. However, the downstream pathways activated by CAMs have remained mostly unknown. Here, we used the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction to investigate the pathways activated by Fasciclin II (FasII), a transmembrane CAM of the Ig superfamily, during synapse remodeling. We show that the ability of FasII to stimulate or to prevent synapse formation depends on the symmetry of transmembrane FasII levels in the presynaptic and postsynaptic cell and requires the presence of the fly homolog of amyloid precursor protein (APPL). In turn, APPL is regulated by direct interactions with the PDZ (postsynaptic density-95/Discs large/zona occludens-1)-containing protein dX11/Mint/Lin-10, which also regulates synapse expansion downstream of FasII. These results provide a novel mechanism by which cell adhesion molecules are regulated and provide fresh insights into the normal operation of APP during synapse development.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: J Neurosci. 2005 Jun 22;25(25):5943-55. Link to article on publisher's site

DOI of Published Version

10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1144-05.2005

Related Resources

Link to article in PubMed

Journal Title

The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience

PubMed ID

15976083

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