Title

The role of the sid1p kinase and cdc14p in regulating the onset of cytokinesis in fission yeast

GSBS Program

Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology

UMMS Affiliation

Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences; Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology

Date

4-25-2000

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Amino Acid Sequence; Blotting, Western; Cell Cycle Proteins; Cell Division; Cloning, Molecular; Flow Cytometry; Fluorescent Antibody Technique; Green Fluorescent Proteins; Luminescent Proteins; Mitosis; Models, Biological; Molecular Sequence Data; Mutagenesis; Protein Binding; Protein Kinases; *Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases; *Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins; Schizosaccharomyces; *Schizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins; Sequence Homology, Amino Acid; Signal Transduction; Time Factors; Tubulin

Disciplines

Life Sciences | Medicine and Health Sciences

Abstract

Coordination of mitosis and cytokinesis is crucial for ensuring proper chromosome segregation and genomic stability. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the sid genes (cdc7, cdc11, cdc14, spg1, sid1, sid2 and sid4) define a signaling pathway that regulates septation and cytokinesis. Here we describe the characterization of a novel protein kinase, Sid1p. Sid1p localizes asymmetrically to one spindle pole body (SPB) in anaphase. Sid1p localization is maintained during medial ring constriction and septum synthesis and disappears prior to cell separation. Additionally, we found that Cdc14p is in a complex with Sid1p. Epistasis analysis places Sid1p-Cdc14p downstream of Spg1p-Cdc7p but upstream of Sid2p. Finally, we show that cyclin proteolysis during mitosis is unaffected by inactivating the sid pathway; in fact, loss of Cdc2-cyclin activity promotes Sid1p-Cdc14p association with the SPB, possibly providing a mechanism that couples cytokinesis with mitotic exit.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: EMBO J. 2000 Apr 17;19(8):1803-15. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to article in PubMed

PubMed ID

10775265