GSBS Student Publications

Student Author(s)

Yuxin Chen

GSBS Program

Immunology & Microbiology

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Medicine

Date

10-18-2012

Document Type

Article

Disciplines

Immunology and Infectious Disease

Abstract

Protective antibodies play a critical role in an effective HIV vaccine; however, eliciting antibodies to block infection by viruses from diverse genetic subtypes remains a major challenge. As the world's most populous country, China has been under the threat of at least three major subtypes of circulating HIV-1 viruses. Understanding the cross reactivity and specificities of serum antibody responses that mediate broad neutralization of the virus in HIV-1 infected Chinese patients will provide valuable information for the design of vaccines to prevent HIV-1 transmission in China. Sera from a cohort of homosexual men, who have been managed by a major HIV clinical center in Beijing, China, were analyzed for cross-sectional neutralizing activities against pseudotyped viruses expressing Env antigens of the major subtype viruses (AE, BC and B subtypes) circulating in China. Neutralizing activities in infected patients' blood were most capable of neutralizing viruses in the homologous subtype; however, a subset of blood samples was able to achieve broad neutralizing activities across different subtypes. Such cross neutralizing activity took 1-2 years to develop and CD4 binding site antibodies were critical components in these blood samples. Our study confirmed the presence of broadly neutralizing sera in China's HIV-1 patient population. Understanding the specificity and breadth of these neutralizing activities can guide efforts for the development of HIV vaccines against major HIV-1 viruses in China.

Rights and Permissions

Copyright: © Zhang et al.

DOI of Published Version

10.1371/journal.pone.0047548

Source

Citation: PLoS One. 2012;7(10):e47548. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0047548. Epub 2012 Oct 18. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal Title

PloS one

PubMed ID

23094060

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

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