GSBS Student Publications

Title

FANCJ localization by mismatch repair is vital to maintain genomic integrity after UV irradiation

Student Author(s)

Shawna S.Guillemette

GSBS Program

Cancer Biology

UMMS Affiliation

Department of Cancer Biology

Date

2-1-2014

Document Type

Article

Medical Subject Headings

Basic-Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors; Cell Line, Tumor; DNA Damage; *DNA Mismatch Repair; DNA Repair; DNA Replication; Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group Proteins; Genomic Instability; Humans; Models, Biological; Mutation; Phosphorylation; Protein Transport; Replication Protein A; S Phase; Ultraviolet Rays

Disciplines

Cancer Biology | Cell and Developmental Biology | Genetics and Genomics

Abstract

Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is critical for the repair of DNA lesions induced by UV radiation, but its contribution in replicating cells is less clear. Here, we show that dual incision by NER endonucleases, including XPF and XPG, promotes the S-phase accumulation of the BRCA1 and Fanconi anemia-associated DNA helicase FANCJ to sites of UV-induced damage. FANCJ promotes replication protein A phosphorylation and the arrest of DNA synthesis following UV irradiation. Interaction defective mutants of FANCJ reveal that BRCA1 binding is not required for FANCJ localization, whereas interaction with the mismatch repair (MMR) protein MLH1 is essential. Correspondingly, we find that FANCJ, its direct interaction with MLH1, and the MMR protein MSH2 function in a common pathway in response to UV irradiation. FANCJ-deficient cells are not sensitive to killing by UV irradiation, yet we find that DNA mutations are significantly enhanced. Thus, we considered that FANCJ deficiency could be associated with skin cancer. Along these lines, in melanoma we found several somatic mutations in FANCJ, some of which were previously identified in hereditary breast cancer and Fanconi anemia. Given that, mutations in XPF can also lead to Fanconi anemia, we propose collaborations between Fanconi anemia, NER, and MMR are necessary to initiate checkpoint activation in replicating human cells to limit genomic instability.

Rights and Permissions

Citation: Cancer Res. 2014 Feb 1;74(3):932-44. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-13-2474. Epub 2013 Dec 18. Link to article on publisher's site

DOI of Published Version

10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-13-2474

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

Journal Title

Cancer research

PubMed ID

24351291